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LPKY on Twitter

If you're a fan of the micro-blogging service Twitter, then make sure to follow us. The account name is lpky.

Right now we're just using it to remind people about upcoming meetings and events, but we also plan to use it to alert people to legislation and other government actions that need a response from concerned citizens.

We are not in China; at least, not yet.

Yesterday, the Kentucky Court of Appeals struck-down the lower-court ruling which allowed Beshear to "seize" internet domains for gambling websites. Source: http://tinyurl.com/7arvve

In China, the government controls what their people are permitted to see on the internet. Even Google has created a specialized version of their search engine to comply with China's web-filtering.

Why does China filter the internet? They filter political and religious viewpoints contrary to the Communist Party's viewpoints. You can read more about Chinese web-filtering here: http://tinyurl.com/9roduh

JPG's Don't Support Transparency

Dave Adams of BIPPS, is asking about the promised e-Transparency we were promised by Governor Beshear: http://bluegrasspolicy-blog.blogspot.com/2009/01/first-disappointment-of...

Going to the actual website, I see a lot of images masquerading as "draft" websites. This is common practice, I suppose, but not on the date when the actual data is to be released.

Ignore the man behind the curtain!

http://www.kentucky.com/210/story/643727.html

Is there a conflict of interest if a lobbyist has a partner in a privileged office of the executive branch? Apparently not, provided you're in Frankfort. From the story:

*****
Although Babbage is a friend and business partner, Edelen said, he is received no differently by the Democratic Beshear administration than other lobbyists at the Capitol. Cutting his ties to Babbage is unnecessary, he added.

"He is treated just like any other lobbyist who comes in," Edelen said. "They're directed to the agency heads who are directly responsible for that given policy area.

Rationalizing a Coup?

Am I reading into this too much? http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?PubID=890

This sounds suspiciously like a rationalization for a coup:

Widespread civil violence inside the United States would force the defense establishment to reorient priorities in extremis to defend basic domestic order and human security. Deliberate employment of weapons of mass destruction or other catastrophic capabilities, unforeseen economic collapse, loss of functioning political and legal order, purposeful domestic resistance or insurgency, pervasive public health emergencies, and catastrophic natural and human disasters are all paths to disruptive domestic shock.

Selling the War

"In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist."-Dwight D. Eisenhower

Today, we take the M-I complex for granted. It is assumed to be the natural order of things, and this is a great tragedy.

On the other hand, we can be glad that there are some citizens who try, against all odds, to keep the government honest. The Department of Defense Inspector General's office caught a group within the DoD using charity monies and tax dollars to market the war to the American people.

Beshear's tax plan; Failure waiting to happen.

On Thursday night, I had the opportunity to go to the Governor's town hall forum in Grant County on the proposed cigarette tax increase.

The opening speaker talked about how we all have to "do our share" to get Kentucky through this crisis.

Governor Beshear's PowerPoint-based presentation showed basic percentage cuts in the budgets of most areas of state government. The Kentucky SEEK funding (the bulk of K-12 funding), Medicare and Medicaid were the primary areas where cuts were not made.

The new website is online

Hello everyone, and welcome.

I am so very pleased that our new website is finally online. We've had a few minor technical difficulties, but I believe those are all resolved. Needless to say, a lot of hours went in to making this happen. A special thanks to Harlen Compton and Mark Gailey for the work involved in getting this new site online.

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